blush bagsyBlush is big news for spring, especially pink… You want to look warm, healthy and rosy but not drag queenish – so less is more.

Follow our guide to applying it properly on Blush Guide.

 

 

Blush is back

So do you know the facts about blushing?

Now we like to have a little bit of colour in our cheeks, but what about the real reason we blush – we all do, some more than others. It can be because we are embarrassed, hot, shy or in love.

Nearly everyone has experienced that deep, unbidden rush of rubescence to the face known as blushing. Charles Darwin was the first to study the phenomenon in 1873, attributing the behavior to a combination of shyness, shame, modesty and self-consciousness.

We may blush for the first time as early as age 2 or 3 when our conscience begins to form. The reaction occurs when the central nervous system picks up an emotion in the brain, and the signals then travel to the capillaries in the face. The capillaries, normally contracted, open and fill with blood, producing the familiar crimson glow and the warm, tingling sensation. The process is automatic and unconscious, much like an eye blink.